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Celebrating Summer! Congratulations, June & July Yard of the Month Winners!

Keep Denton Beautiful started the 2020 Yard of the Month season awarding the winning yard for the Yard of the Month program through a public vote on our Facebook page. In July, we transitioned back to our typical process - leaving door hangers to notify residents of their nomination and awarding one yard as their district's winner.

In these summertime yards, you'll find a wide variety of native species. These Texas natives can hold their own in the heat with minimal need for supplemental watering. Environmentally friendly and beautiful- seems like a win-win to us!

Just a few of the plants you'll find:

918 N. Elm St. - boxwood, hollies, lorpetulum, spirea, & Variegated Loripe
2528 Jamestown Ln. - Gulf Muhly grass, phlox, Mexican petunia,Texas rock rose, Gaura, & Yucca

1613 Amherst Dr. - salvia, lilies, coneflowers, creeping phlox, Turk's cap, and a Live Oak tree
715 Gober. St - blue agave, elephant ears, marigolds, sweet potato plants, cedar tree
1333 Cambridge Ln. - Echinacea, pink coneflowers, lamb's ear, Hosta, ferns, Redbud and Acer trees
414 Parkway St. - Impatiens, boxwood, hollies, Vinca major, Dwarf Nandina, oak & crepe myrtle trees

June Winning Yards

July Winning Yards

What to Plant in Denton this August

Although August can produce some of the hottest temperatures of the summer in Denton, it is also a crucial month for beginning your cold-weather gardening.

Cold-weather veggies include broccoli, radishes, cauliflower, kale, spinach and more. If you want to harvest fresh vegetables for cooking during the winter months, now is the time to plant them!

Irises are dormant now, so this is the best time to plant them. These flowers are hardy growers in North Texas, and are often found surviving in areas where they receive little to no maintenance. Denton soils range from clay to sandy – if you’re soil is heavily clay, add several inches of coarse sand and compost. Irises love sandy loam soil – although they are known to do well without much care, taking the extra step to prepare your soil will ensure their success in your garden.

Photo of iris by KDB intern Haley Pittman
Photo of iris by KDB intern Haley Pittman

Want to try growing a pumpkin for Halloween? Pumpkins prefer warmer temperatures, and it can be difficult to time their season just right for harvesting in October. Plant your pumpkin seeds early this month for a shot at a homegrown Halloween pumpkin.

Photo of homegrown pumpkins via Eat the Weeds
Photo of homegrown pumpkins via Eat the Weeds

If you planted summer herbs and vegetables, go ahead and harvest them this month.


As always, happy planting from all of us at KDB!

For more advice on pruning and planting, check out some tips from our friends with the Denton County Master Gardener Association and the Denton County AgriLife Extension Office.

Finally, be sure to buy your starters, seeds and supplies from our local partners Painted Flower Farm and Four Seasons Nursery and get a KDB members-only discount when you renew your membership for 2015! Just show your KDB membership card at checkout.

What to Plant in Denton this July

It may not feel like it, but July is the time to start prepping your garden for fall!

Naturally, July calls for a beautiful Independence Day garden arrangement. Fill a pot with red, white, and blue petunias for a classic, all-American look. Or, use flowers and plants in your decorations. Dried onion heads are a surprisingly perfect plant for 4th of July centerpieces – they happen to look a lot like fireworks! Save the seeds afterwards to plant again in the spring.

Make use of wildflower seeds and plant discounts through your KDB Membership to provide teaching opportunities for kids. Little gardeners can grow their own Victory Garden, or throw out seeds, water, and watch them sprout!

Photo of onion flower by Daniel Young
Photo of onion flower by Daniel Young

For fall-harvest fruits, add tomato plants to your vegetable garden now. However, don’t let your tomatoes dry out in the heat – plant them somewhere where they will receive partial shade in the afternoons. These plants will begin to produce fruit when the temperatures drop in the fall.

Photo of tomato plant via Plant University
Photo of tomato plant via Plant University

Throughout the season, harvest your annual herbs, such as basil. Be sure to let these plants grow back – if you allow them to continue growing, your herbs will last through August!


For more advice on pruning and planting, check out some tips from our friends with the Denton County Master Gardener Association and the Denton County AgriLife Extension Office.

Finally, be sure to buy your starters, seeds and supplies from our local partners Painted Flower Farm and Four Seasons Nursery to get a KDB members-only discount! Just show your KDB membership card at checkout.

As always, happy planting from all of us at KDB!